The Brain Needs to Hear

One of the best reasons to stay on top of your hearing health and seek treatment for any issues with it is the link between hearing and cognitive performance. It has become increasingly clear in recent years that “losing” one’s hearing is often intertwined with weakening of one’s mind.
Several scientific studies have found that hearing loss, especially when untreated, can speed up changes to the brain that come with aging. This includes it literally shrinking—and untreated hearing loss can make this worse.


A 2019 study published in Alzheimer’s & Dementia, based on research by a team from Brigham and Women’s Hospital that spanned eight years, found that hearing loss was associated with a higher risk for cognitive deterioration.


“Our findings show that hearing loss is associated with new onset of subjective cognitive concerns which may be indicative of early stage changes in cognition. These findings may help identify individuals at greater risk of cognitive decline,” stated lead author Sharon Curhan, MD.
These most recent findings come after previous studies also pointed to changes in the brain that were driven, at least in part, by hearing loss.
One such study in 2014, carried out by Johns Hopkins Medicine and the National Institute on Aging, used MRI images of participants in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging — which has been active since 1958 — for analysis. It found that early intervention to limit hearing loss could be key to preventing permanent changes to the brain’s structure that, once occurring, cannot be reversed.


It seems clear that, in addition to just making life easier by enhancing one’s hearing, treating hearing issues will very likely have positive long-term effects on overall quality of life—and long-term health.

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