The Bottom Line Cost of Untreated Hearing Loss

Hearing loss that goes untreated is not just a quality-of-life issue. It can be a financial one too.

The Better Hearing Institute (BHI) conducted a survey that found that individuals with more minor hearing issues that they did not rectify saw a decrease in income. And people with more significant hearing issues that weren’t treated were unemployed at twice the rate as people without hearing issues.

It’s hard to imagine any job that doesn’t demand communication skills. And poor hearing will obviously cause issues in most cases.

With the trend of hearing issues cropping up earlier in life for many people, this is an issue that will become more significant in human resource departments and for individual workers. In fact, most of the 40 million Americans who have hearing issues are still working. Estimates are that 10 percent of the workforce has some problem with their hearing.

In addition, the trend is also for older people to stay in the workforce at higher rates than just a few decades ago.

The BHI study also showed that effective treatment curtailed the economic impact of hearing loss. Workers with mild hearing loss who got hearing aids saw the downward effect on their incomes cut by 90 to 100 percent. A reduction of 65–77 percent was found for those with severe to moderate hearing loss.

These trends — along with the fact that some jobs expose workers to extreme noise environments — will mean that recognizing and treating hearing loss will probably become a more normalized part of the work environment. It is in the interest of both employers and employees to proactively deal with this issue.