The Bottom Line Cost of Untreated Hearing Loss

Hearing loss that goes untreated is not just a quality-of-life issue. It can be a financial one too.

The Better Hearing Institute (BHI) conducted a survey that found that individuals with more minor hearing issues that they did not rectify saw a decrease in income. And people with more significant hearing issues that weren’t treated were unemployed at twice the rate as people without hearing issues.

It’s hard to imagine any job that doesn’t demand communication skills. And poor hearing will obviously cause issues in most cases.

With the trend of hearing issues cropping up earlier in life for many people, this is an issue that will become more significant in human resource departments and for individual workers. In fact, most of the 40 million Americans who have hearing issues are still working. Estimates are that 10 percent of the workforce has some problem with their hearing.

In addition, the trend is also for older people to stay in the workforce at higher rates than just a few decades ago.

The BHI study also showed that effective treatment curtailed the economic impact of hearing loss. Workers with mild hearing loss who got hearing aids saw the downward effect on their incomes cut by 90 to 100 percent. A reduction of 65–77 percent was found for those with severe to moderate hearing loss.

These trends — along with the fact that some jobs expose workers to extreme noise environments — will mean that recognizing and treating hearing loss will probably become a more normalized part of the work environment. It is in the interest of both employers and employees to proactively deal with this issue.

Some Hearing Aid Myths Explained

When faced with the fact of hearing loss — or the likely need for a hearing aid — a number of myths might be lodged in one’s understanding that will need to be rethought. Here are some common “fact or fiction” scenarios.

The first is getting over the assumption that “my hearing’s not that bad, so I don’t really need a hearing aid.” Most hearing loss is gradual, not sudden. The reason it’s slow moving is because the ability to hear different frequencies degrades at different rates, meaning you can hear a lot of things and sort of deal with it. For awhile — and at a cost. But high-quality hearing is based on effectively hearing the entire sound spectrum within the human range. The sooner a hearing aid is used to restore all of the sounds the ear can process the better.

A secondary assumption is that most people only need one hearing aid, that the “good” ear is good enough to continue going solo. Sometimes that’s the case, but if hearing loss is due to noise exposure — well, both ears were probably taking a beating. And the same genes are at play on both sides of your head. A binaural fitting is often the best choice, since the brain is wired to have both ears inputting sound of equal quality.

Finally, one myth is that getting a hearing aid is pretty much like getting glasses. Actually, adjusting to using a hearing aid is a little more complicated. A new pair of glasses might take some getting used to externally, but the brain really doesn’t need to do any readjusting to process clearer vision. Hearing is a little more complicated. There’s more variance in the details of what frequencies an individual is not processing. That’s why the fine-tuning of hearing aids — much easier and impactful with today’s powerful computer-based models — and auditory training will very likely be part of adapting to a new hearing aid.

Ways To Work Out Your Hearing

There are any number of ways to maintain your hearing health — or even improve it. Here are a few ideas that you can incorporate into your life to help keep your hearing in shape.

Any kind of cardiovascular exercise will help your hearing. Blood flow is very important to the functioning of the inner ear and the brain, which processes the data sent to it. Activities like walking, running, swimming, yoga, or meditation can all help reduce stress, better circulation, and heighten overall health — which will be of benefit to your hearing health.

For many, meditation has proved very effective with hearing issues, including tinnitus. Stress can be a risk factor in hearing loss and anything that can lessen it will be beneficial. Also, practicing sound isolation — which overlaps with meditation in many ways — can help exercise your hearing system. By putting other senses in the background and concentrating on hearing the specific sounds around you. The parts of the brain that handle the hearing process can get a good workout. This can make a difference as the aging process changes the baseline of one’s hearing capabilities.

And there are specific yoga poses — tree, lotus, cobra, and triangle, for example — that act to increase blood flow specifically to the ear and the brain.

And in our digital age, there are a whole host of computer aids and apps that are designed to exercise your hearing system. Some of these are “brain teaser” games that exercise the brain in general ways, while other programs are designed specifically for those with hearing issues or as assistants in adapting to the use of a hearing aid.

There are a wealth of activities that can be part of keeping your hearing in tip-top shape.

The Wild World of Interconnectivity

Modern hearing aids are marvels of not only audiology, but also computer science. More and more they are becoming part of the Internet of Things (IoT), a myriad of products and technology that allow devices to communicate with one another.

Since hearing aids are ultimately about bettering communication, this new technology fits right in.

The industry buzz phrase is “smart hearing.” What this means is the computer power of a hearing aid can be connected to a myriad of other devices that now incorporate computing capabilities — not just computers, but everything from doorbells to TVs to smartphones. This is possible because the computing power that, fifty years ago, required a computer the size of a steamer trunk can now occur in a device small enough to fit behind your ear.

The practical benefits include being able to stream audio from a TV or stereo directly into your hearing aid, linking to your smartphone in order to expand the capabilities, sending real-time data about your hearing aid’s performance to your hearing-health professional so that it can be better adjusted to your needs, and even routing the sound of your doorbell into your hearing aid.

These capabilities not only heighten the hearing experience, but they also give you the ability to route control features from your hearing aid to an app on a smartphone. This allows you to make adjustments far more easily and without anyone noticing that you are doing so. No fumbling around with a small hearing aid.

You can look like just another soul staring at your phone while you’re actually changing the volume level and mix features of your hearing aid.