Take Hearing Loss Seriously

There are a host of reasons to take hearing loss seriously and then take steps to counteract it, including the obvious ones like increasing quality of life and better maintaining social connections and work skills.

But another more ominous one is the increasing evidence that untreated hearing loss can adversely impact the onset of dementia.

According to the website of Johns Hopkins Medicine, one of the world’s premier medical institutions: “In a study that tracked 639 adults for nearly 12 years, Johns Hopkins expert Frank Lin, M.D., Ph.D, and his colleagues found that mild hearing loss doubled dementia risk. Moderate loss tripled risk, and people with a severe hearing impairment were five times more likely to develop dementia.”

The risk can’t be much clearer than that.

Although the causal link is not fully understood, the suspicion is that the lack of input from the auditory system actually causes parts of the brain to atrophy. Basically, not only is the complex functions that translate external sound waves into internal hearing via electrical impulses the way we hear, but it’s also great exercise for the brain. When it is curtailed, the ultimate receiver—the brain—degrades due to a lack of activity.

Another theory is that the dwindling ability to communicate well with others leads to social isolation and loneliness, both of which have also been linked to increased risk for the onset of dementia.

Regardless of the particulars, the obvious takeaway is that hearing loss should be treated as soon as possible. With modern hearing aids, treating it is now routine and should not be delayed. And testing hearing should join other passages of middle age—like colon cancer screening, cholesterol profiles, and shingles vaccine boosters—as part of a holistic approach to health.